Retrospective analysis of reproductive losses and child mortality rates in indigenous people of the Arctic zone of Western Siberia, Russia

Theme 5. Other
Session Name 5.3 Health promotion and population health
Presentation Type Poster
Presenter
Author(s) Sergei Andronov (Arctic Research Center of the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district, Russian Federation), Andrei Lobanov (Arctic Research Center of the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district, Russian Federation), Andrei Popov (Arctic Research Center of the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district, Russian Federation), Ruslan Kochkin (Arctic Research Center of the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district, Russian Federation), Elena Bogdanova (Northern Arctic Federal University, Russian Federation)
Abstract text

Living in the High North affects women’s reproductive health which requires special attention. Our study aimed to conduct retrospective analysis of reproductive losses and child mortality rates depending on ethnos, area of residence, nomadic or settled lifestyle in 2013-18 in the Yamalo-Nenets Autonomous Okrug.


879 women were examined and interviewed, 627 of them – indigenous ones (Nenets) of the Yamalsky, Nadymsky and Tazovsky districts. The information of 1650 pregnancies was included. To assess the reliability of differences between groups, the χ2 criterion was used, p<0.05.


Birth of children was twice more frequent in the residents of the Tazovsky (51.0%) and Yamalsky (44.9%) districts, compared to the Nadymsky district (29.7%) (χ2-28.8, p<0.001, and χ2-11.8, p<0.001). Abortion was twice as frequent among the residents of the Nadymsky district (31.3%), compared to the Tazovsky (9.4%) (χ2-50.5, p<0.001) and Yamalsky (12.9%) (χ2-23.5, p<0.001) districts.


Birth of children was higher in the group 1 (66.7%), compared to the group 2 (41.4%) (χ2-29.0, p<0.001). Induced abortion was twice more often in arrived population (50.0%), compared to indigenous settlement residents (28.0%) (χ2-73.7, p<0.001) and five times more frequent than in tundra inhabitants (7.8%) (χ2-82.3, p<0.001). Spontaneous miscarriage was three times more in indigenous tundra residents (25.5%), compared to arrived population (8.6%) (χ2-30.8, p<0.001) and twice more often than in indigenous settlement residents (12.9%) (χ2-17.3, p<0.001). Child mortality rates were: 24.4% in indigenous tundra residents, 6.8% in indigenous settlement inhabitants (χ2-36.8, p<0.001), 2.9% in arrived population (χ2-41.7, p <0.001).


Support from the RFBR (grant № 18-010-00875\18).