Reproductive health of women in the Arctic zone of Western Siberia, Russian Federation

Theme 5. Other
Session Name 5.3 Health Promotion / Population Health 2. & 3.
Datetime Sep 07, 2018 10:04 AM - 10:21 AM (UTC +3)
Presentation Type Oral
Presenter Elena Bogdanova
Author(s) Andrei Lobanov (Arctic Research Center of the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district, Russian Federation), Elena Bogdanova (Northern Arctic Federal University, Russian Federation), Sergei Andronov (Arctic Research Center of the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district, Russian Federation), Andrei Popov (Arctic Research Center of the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district, Russian Federation), Ruslan Kochkin (Arctic Research Center of the Yamal-Nenets autonomous district, Russian Federation)
Abstract text

Introduction: Nomadic lifestyle, undeveloped transport infrastructure impact on maintenance of women’s health, access to medical aid of quality. Our study aimed to analyze data of indigenous women’s reproductive health.


Methods: 879 indigenous women (Nenets) in the Arctic zone of Western Siberia were interviewed. The indicators of reproductive health were analyzed depending on age, residence area, nomadic or settled lifestyle, social factors, education, presence of genital and extragenital pathology in 2013-18.


Results: Birth rates were higher and level of abortions was lower in the Tazovsky and Yamalsky districts. However, due to extreme living conditions in tundra, high level of spontaneous miscarriage was proved. Though, in the Nadymsky district, induced abortion is more often, the levels of birth rates and spontaneous miscarriage are low.


Despite extreme living conditions and low educational level, in tundra residents, there is significantly higher pregnancy, birth and spontaneous miscarriage rates, though the levels of induced abortion and gynecological pathology are much lower. Earlier menopause and chronic bronchitis are more typical for tundra residents.


In indigenous settlement residents, despite more comfortable living conditions and average educational level (competed secondary school), we found higher level of gynecological diseases with inflammatory component and higher frequency of overweight (extragenital pathology). Although, compared to tundra inhabitants, there are less registered marriages, higher level of widowhood and lonely living.


Conclusions: Our study of indigenous women’s reproductive health is especially important not only from medical and social positions, but also in terms of indigenous population maintenance.


Support from the RFBR (grant № 18-010-00875\18).

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